Is Law School Worth the Cost?

Back in September I hosted a panel discussion on #CollegeChat via Twitter whether Law School was worth the cost. It continues to be a hot topic in higher education amdist declining law school applications, rising tuition and debt for graduates, and unstable job prospects. Below is WorldWideLearn’s infographic “Law School 2.0: How law schools and law careers are changing”.

 

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Noted Social Media Scholar to Discuss How the Frequency of College Students’ Facebook Usage Correlates to Academic Engagement on #CollegeChat June 5th

Professor Rey Junco will discuss recent research on college students’ Facebook use #CollegeChat on June 5, 2012 at 9 p.m. Eastern

Dr. Rey Junco, professor at Lock Haven University and a youth and media lab mentor at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society at Harvard University, will discuss his latest research on the relationship between Facebook use and college student engagement on #CollegeChat June 5, 2012 at 9 p.m. Eastern.

During #CollegeChat, Junco (http://twitter.com/reyjunco) will discuss research findings from a recent study he authored “The relationship between frequency of Facebook use, participating in Facebook activities, and student engagement” with attendees including:

  • Is there a relationship between frequency of Facebook use and activities and student engagement?
  • Is there a relationship between frequency of Facebook use and activities and time spent preparing for class?
  • Is there a relationship between frequency of Facebook use and activities and time spent in co-curricular activities?
  • Why are these results important for higher education administrators, faculty and staff important?
  • Why is it important for higher education to design and support interventions that meet students where they are on Facebook and other social media sites?

Rey Junco is a social media scholar who investigates the impact of social technologies on college students. Rey’s primary research interest is using quantitative methods to analyze the effects of social media on student psychosocial development, engagement, and learning. His research has also focused on informing best practices in using social technologies to enhance learning outcomes. For instance, Rey’s research has shown that technology, specifically social media like Facebook and Twitter, can be used in ways that improve engagement and academic performance. Rey has recently published papers on: the relationship between Facebook use, student engagement, and learning, the academic effects of multitasking, the digital divide in cell phone ownership and use, using social media to promote civil discourse on college campuses, and how Twitter can be used for academic purposes in order to increase student engagement and improve grades.

About #CollegeChat

#CollegeChat is a live bi-monthly conversation intended for teens, college students, parents, and higher education experts on Twitter. #CollegeChat takes place on the first and third Tuesday of the month at 6 p.m. PT/ 9 p.m. ET. Questions for each #CollegeChat edition can be sent to Theresa Smith, the moderator of #CollegeChat via http://Twitter.com/collegechat, by entering questions online on the CollegeChat Facebook page or by email. More detailed information about signing up for Twitter and participating in #Collegechat can be found at http://pathwaypr.com/how-to-participate-in-a-twitter-chat .

#CollegeChat Transcript: Social Media and Recruiting of High School Athletes

Social media has quickly transformed the world of athletic recruiting in just a short period of time according to Karen Weaver, EdD, director of Athletics for Penn State University-Abington and a TV color analyst for ESPN, CBS College Sports and Big Ten Network. Weaver was a recent guest on #CollegeChat and discussed how social media is benefitting both athletic programs and high school athletes who want to play in college.

During #CollegeChat, Weaver addressed the following questions:

How has social media changed athletic recruiting?

Can college coaches “friend” students on FaceBook? What are the guidelines?

What are the best practices in for both recruiters and prospective athletes to use in technology and social media?

What questions should an athlete ask a coach on a college visit?

Has social media changed high school athlete recruiting for the better?

How has social media helped get student athletes recruited? Is Youtube helping? Twitter feeds of club games?

Do high school students need to go through the expense of belonging to fee based online recruiting sites?

The entire transcript is available for download Social Media & Recruiting Transcript

Social Media’s Role on Recruiting High School Athletes #CollegeChat May 22, 2012

College Athletics Director and TV Sports Analyst to Discuss Growing Role of Social Media on Recruitment of High School Athletes #CollegeChat May 22, 2012

Karen Weaver, EdD, director of Athletics for Penn State University-Abington and a TV color analyst for ESPN, CBS College Sports and Big Ten Network, will discuss the growing role of social media on the recruiting of high school athletes during   #CollegeChat on Twitter, May 22, 2012 at 9 p.m. Eastern.

In just the last few years the role of social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook have dramatically changed the recruiting of high school athletes according to Weaver. During #Collegechat, Weaver, https://twitter.com/#!/collegeathlete , will discuss:

  •  How has social media changed athletic recruiting?
  • Has social media changed athlete recruiting for the better?
  • What are the pitfalls?
  • What are the best practices in for both recruiters and prospective athletes to use in technology and social media?
  • Are college coaches and their recruiters being too invasive on high school athletes’ privacy?
  • Should college coaches be allowed to “friend” students on FaceBook?
  • Are college coaches being allowed to ask for passwords in order to examine high school athletes’ student accounts?
  • How has social media helped get student athletes recruited?
  • Do high school students need to go through the expense of belonging to fee based online recruiting sites?

About Karen Weaver

Karen Weaver is an Ivy League-educated consultant, scholar, speaker, and administrator with experience that includes positions as a director of Athletics, adjunct professor, and head coach for schools at the NCAA Division I, III, and small college levels. Weaver is also a television color analyst for ESPN, CBS College Sports and Big Ten Network. As a former All-American and national championship coach, Weaver is recognized as an expert in broadcast rights and new media, athletic administration, and college recruitment; and also serves as a recruiting educator for student athletes, parents, and coaches. In addition, Weaver is an athletics consultant to senior leaders in higher education.

About #CollegeChat

#CollegeChat is a live bi-monthly conversation intended for teens, college students, parents, and higher education experts on Twitter. #CollegeChat takes place on the first and third Tuesday of the month at 6 p.m. PT/ 9 p.m. ET. Questions for each #CollegeChat edition can be sent to Theresa Smith, the moderator of #CollegeChat via http://Twitter.com/collegechat, by entering questions online on the CollegeChat Facebook page or by email. More detailed information about signing up for Twitter and participating in #Collegechat can be found at http://pathwaypr.com/how-to-participate-in-a-twitter-chat .

What’s the Price of Higher Education? An Infographic

The Price of Higher EducationSource: H&R Block

I like this infographic a lot but only as a starting point. Note, the colleges noted as the most expensive school are not necessarily so. They are the most expensive in sticker price but a large number of students do not pay the sticker price. That’s where your grades, course load, SAT and ACT scores, financial need, your athletic or musical talents play a huge part in what you will actually pay. Go to the schools and check out their financial aid section to find out how much is actually doled out. Make sure to aim for schools where your GPA, scores, talents will place you in top 25% of admitted students.

#CollegeChat Transcript: How to Evaluate Colleges Financially with Lynn O’Shaughnessy

Last night, Lynn O’Shaughnessy, a bestselling author and higher education journalist, shared  advice from her newly published book The College Solution: A Guide for Everyone Looking for the Right School at the Right Price (2nd Edition) during #CollegeChat on Twitter.

We had an interesting discussion revolving around how to find the right school at the right price. We covered the following topics:

  • What are the biggest sources of college money.
  • How can you increase your chances of qualifying for merit scholarships.
  • How can you evaluate the generosity of a school before applying.
  • Where to find the best online tools to evaluate colleges.
  • What do families of divorce need to know about financial aid.
  • How to use net price calculators.

You can read the entire 34 page transcript here Collegeblogs Transcript 5-15-12

Best Selling Higher Education Author Lynn O’Shaughnessy to Provide Advice on How to Evaluate Colleges #CollegeChat May 15th

O’Shaughnessy to discuss advice from her new book “The College Solution: A Guide for Everyone Looking for the Right School at the Right price (2nd Edition)

Lynn O’Shaughnessy, a bestselling author and higher education journalist, will share advice from her newly published book The College Solution: A Guide for Everyone Looking for the Right School at the Right Price (2nd Edition) during #CollegeChat on Twitter, May 15, 2012 at 9 p.m. Eastern.

O’Shaughnessy wrote the second edition of her book “so you too can become an empowered consumer.” During #Collegechat, O’Shaughnessy, https://twitter.com/#!/collegeblogs , will discuss key information parents and students need to know including:

  • What are the biggest sources of college money.
  • How can you increase your chances of qualifying for merit scholarships.
  • How you can evaluate the generosity of a school before applying.
  • Where to find the best online tools to evaluate colleges.
  • What do families of divorce need to know about financial aid.
  • What are a teen’s options if he/she does poorly on the ACT or SAT.
  • What is the real story behind athletic scholarships.

About Lynn O’Shaughnessy

Lynn O’Shaughnessy is a nationally recognized higher-ed author, journalist, and speaker. She is the author of numerous books including her Amazon bestseller: The College Solution: A Guide for Everyone Looking for the Right School at the Right Price. She also wrote Shrinking the Cost of College, a workbook available only on her website, that helps families make smart and affordable college choices. O’Shaughnessy writes frequently about college issues for her CBS MoneyWatch column and for her popular college blog TheCollegeSolution.com. O’Shaughnessy is the consulting director of college planning, K-12, at the University of California, San Diego Extension. She is also a frequent speaker on how families can find and afford great schools.

About #CollegeChat

#CollegeChat is a live bi-monthly conversation intended for teens, college students, parents, and higher education experts on Twitter. #CollegeChat takes place on the first and third Tuesday of the month at 6 p.m. PT/ 9 p.m. ET. Questions for each #CollegeChat edition can be sent to Theresa Smith, the moderator of #CollegeChat via http://Twitter.com/collegechat, by entering questions online on the CollegeChat Facebook page or by email. More detailed information about signing up for Twitter and participating in #Collegechat can be found at http://pathwaypr.com/how-to-participate-in-a-twitter-chat

Making Summer Count: Internships, Volunteering and Summer School

Habitat for Humanity in Jefferson CityFor many high school students the countdown to summer and their impending AP exams is in full swing. But, if these students want to squeeze in even more enrichment opportunities into their summer plans they need to get going now.

Mark Babbitt, CEO of You Tern, and Jessica Hertz, Manager of Online Services, for University Language Services, discussed with #CollegeChat attendees how to enrich their summer through internships, volunteering, and summer school. Both believe that by pursuing enrichment opportunities students will be benefitting themselves in the long term. According to Hertz, “College admissions officers want to see applicants who are involved in extracurricular. Plus you can explore new interests and try new things.”

Babbitt concurs.”In today’s ultra competitive job market, job seekers need an advantage. Good grades, even a degree, won’t cut it for most.”

How to Research Summer Enrichment Opportunities

Start your search locally. Babbitt recommends students interested in internships, job shadowing or volunteering should start their search at their high school. He recommends students look into what local businesses and non profits already have relationships with their school. Hertz added, “If there is an organization that you love, ask them if they have internships and or volunteer opportunities.”

Sam Coren, tweeting for Student Advisor, a Washington Post site for all things college, suggests students check out Teen Life and their “excellent listing of college summer programs.” Another source to check out is on the College Board web site at “5 Ways to Stay on Track in Summer.”

Network, Network, Network to Find Internships

Most people think of college students when they think of internships. But according to Babbitt, internships aren’t just for college students anymore. You Tern has helped many high school students find internships. He also recommends that students check out Idealist.org. Once a student finds a company to intern for Babbitt recommends the student make sure to check out the company’s Facebook page, Twitter account, and what is being said about that company on social media sites LinkedIn and Glassdoor.com. Babbitt believes it is more important about what is being said about a company in social media than what a company is saying about itself in its annual report.

“The best way to find internships is to ask around and be persistent,” said Hertz.  “Find a company or organization you love and ask.” Shonda Goward, a college admissions advisor and founder of First Generation University, agreed. “Don’t forget to ask your high school administrators. If they see you’re motivated they may help you find an internship.”  And don’t forget your family and friends. High school internships typically come from family and friends according to Goward.

“Networking, networking, networking,” said Babbitt. “And shoot for a paid internship versus working at Target or Taco Bell.” Once you have an internship offer “ask for expectations, hours and the job description before accepting,” recommended Priscilla from Weekend in Paris.

And if a student ends up in a bad internship he should leave advised John Carpenter, an educational consultant.

Check Locally First for Volunteering

The same tactics that students use to find internships can also be used to find volunteering opportunities. Look to those you know, to your school and then your local community.  “Think about what matters to you and volunteer in that,” advises Hertz. “Are you an animal lover? Try the humane society. Is art your thing? Be a docent at a gallery. Are you a math whiz? Try volunteering to tutor young kids.”

Coren recommends high school students check out Charity Navigator to find well run non-profit organizations to volunteer at. Don’t worry too much about how much time you have to volunteer. “If you only have five hours a week to volunteer and the organization is ok with that, than five hours it is. If you can do ten hours a week even better,” said Hertz.

Check out Summer School Programs Close by, Online and at Dream School

High school students have a multitude of options for summer school. Check out high school summer school classes, junior college classes, online classes offered by junior colleges, four year schools and even online colleges. Hertz added, “Community college will usually be the most economical. Taking college classes can be a great way to try a subject your high school doesn’t offer. However, students need to be wary of online programs. Some are good but many are not.”

High School students should also look into summer programs that are offered by colleges they are interested in attending says Fuji Fulgueras, a college admissions counselor. However, Babbitt added, “Consider the needs and type of student first. Sending a high school junior off to Stanford can be intimidating and bad for confidence.”

If earning credits in summer school is important, students need to make sure they can either get credits approved by their high school or the class is accepted by the four year college they are interested in attending. Coren advised, “If transferring credits is important than stay general; calculus isn’t as sexy as a foreign film class but every college has it.”

However, if credits aren’t important, “take a class act that interests you and don’t worry about the credit,” said Hertz. For as Carpenter pointed out, “Good summer experiences don’t have to be expensive. Volunteer work, shadowing, four weeks on a job with a mentor all can be great.”

What suggestions do you have for teens looking to make their summer count?

#CollegeChat Transcript: SAT/ACT Accomodations for ADD/ADHD High School Students

Jenn Cohen, a college test preparation expert for the SAT, PSAT and ACT, specializing in ADD/ADHD and special needs students, was a recent expert guest on #CollegeChat and provided tips for high school students with ADD/ADHD and other learning disabilities how to maximize their SAT and ACT scores through test preparation and making sure to secure test accomodations. During the one hour discussion, Jenn covered a number of topics including what types of accomodations are available and how to research them, how to determine which test is best for each student, how long to prepare for the test, and how to construct a test preparation plan. Jenn had a lot of great suggestions and you can read through the 31 page transcript  here : adhd_transcript.

Build Your Network and Influence through Twitter Chats

If you have been here before you probably know that I am a very enthusiastic participant on Twitter. So enthusiastic in fact that twice a month I moderate #CollegeChat on Twitter. Recently, Up and Running asked me to write “How can Twitter chat help your business?”  to help guide startups and small businesses on how to participate in Twitter chats to help build influence and enhance engagement in your targeted market. You can read the entire post at Up and Running. An excerpt follows below.

One of the best ways for small businesses to build their networks and increase their influence is by participating in Twitter Chats. Twitter chats are Twitter based conversations that anyone can participate in and are kept on track through the use of a #hashtag, a topic with a hash symbol (“#”) at the start to identify it. There are currently more than 600 ongoing Twitter Chats, ranging from weekly to monthly discussions on a wide variety of topics. You can review an exhaustive list of ongoing chats maintained at the Twitter Chat Schedule.

Participating in a Twitter chat is a great way to network and interact with other people who may also share your professional and personal passions. It is also a great way to introduce yourself and your business to key influencers whom you want to connect with.

Be Strategic

Look for a chat where you can bring value to the conversation. For example, I moderate #CollegeChat twice a month on Tuesday evenings. Most of the chats I moderate are in question and answer format and include an “expert” guest on a particular topic. The majority of guests I first met by their attending and participating in #CollegeChat. My guests have included professors, authors, independent higher education experts and business owners targeting the higher education market.

With hundreds of ongoing Twitter chats, you should be able to find a number of chats that are ideal for both networking and for your business. Perhaps you have developed a business tool, application or book that you are targeting to business to business marketers? Then you might want to check out #B2Bchat. A recent #B2Bchat focused on “Facebook for B2B -The Times They Are a-Changin’.

Expand your Knowledge

Also consider joining in Twitter chats just to expand your knowledge. Have you been considering adding a blog to your website but really don’t know where to start? Consider checking out #Blogchat on Sunday evenings to get fresh ideas from blogging experts. Recently Brian Solis, a thought leader in new media and a best-selling author, was a guest for #Blogchat and discussed with attendees how to use blogs as tools to build influence.

Do you need some new ideas for your start-up or small business?  #Smallbizchat is a great chat for small businesses since its focus is on helping small businesses to succeed as they start to grow. Recently on #Smallbizchat, Dina Dwyer-Owen, a certified franchise executive with more than 30 years of industry experience and a recent guest on the television program “Undercover Boss”, shared with attendees “How to Live Rich in Your Small Business”. #Smallbizchat is hosted weekly by Melinda Emerson, a noted small business expert, coach and author.

How to Participate

In order to participate in a Twitter chat, attendees will need to have a Twitter account.  To sign up for a Twitter account, go to http:// twitter.com. Once you have your Twitter account, you are ready to go.

There are a number of formats to use to follow a Twitter chat but the easiest way I have found to participate is by using TweetChat, a platform designed to make “Twitter chats” run easily.

Don’t be a Bystander

In order to get the most out of any Twitter chat is to make sure you join in. Most moderators ask attendees to go ahead and introduce themselves. Your introduction is a great way to begin meeting others.

By joining in a chat you are not only sharing your ideas with the attendees but also with the attendees’ followers. Don’t be surprised if you pick up a number of new followers after the chat based on comments and interactions you had during the chat.  Every time you write a tweet that is then re-tweeted – quoted or rebroadcast by other attendees – your tweet is not only repeated across the chat but also to the followers of the person who re-tweeted you, thereby expanding your reach exponentially.

And, the best parts about participating in Twitter chats are the people you meet and the network you build.